The girl who feels no pain

“The girl who feels no pain was in the kitchen, stirring ramen noodles, when the spoon slipped from her hand and dropped into the pot of boiling water.”

What I’m reading today: The Hazards of Growing Up Painlessly, a New York Times Magazine piece on a girl with a genetic mutation that renders her unable to feel pain. A UF physician, Dr. Roland Staud, makes a cameo.

Here’s the story behind the story: an interview with the writer.

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For young grads, it’s long leap from college to career

What I’m reading today: For young grads, it’s long leap from college to career

This is the first of a three-part series by Lane DeGregory. She focuses on three recent graduates of New College of Florida, a public liberal arts honors college in Sarasota, Fla., to tell the story of something that’s on a lot of our minds lately — finding good jobs after graduation.

“She packed quickly that week, clearing out her childhood room: boots and jackets, a family photo, a new camera her parents bought so they could see her new life.
She didn’t pack her diploma.”

Photos of RFK mourners lining the train tracks

This is another gem we studied in my visual journalism class today.

PROCESSION: After Kennedy’s funeral in New York the morning of June 8, 1968, his body was transported to Washington. Mourners, about a million by some estimates, lined the tracks, and the trip, usually about four hours, took twice that long. Photo by Paul Fusco.Watch this three-minute slideshow and listen as photographer Paul Fusco describes his famous series shot from the train carrying Robert F. Kenney’s body from New York City to Washington, D.C. He was shocked to find so many Americans, about a million by some estimates, saluting Kennedy’s procession. The journey usually lasts four hours, but because of the mourners lining the tracks it took twice that long.

“It was eight hours of just constant flood of emotion,” Fusco said.

His photos captured the way people felt about RFK, and his photos document that history in a way words cannot. I always wonder what might have been if RFK hadn’t been shot in ’68…

The Way Home: Returning to the National Parks

Video

“Although our national parks belong to all Americans, it’s a sad fact that very few people of color ever set foot in some of our country’s most beautiful places.”

We watched this multimedia piece by the National Parks Conservation Association in my visual journalism class today. Not only is it an example of a well done video, it’s also about so many things I love — history, social justice, nature, healing. And it’s illuminating for me as a TRiP leader, because our outdoor adventure organization struggles to attract people of color and other people historically marginalized for various reasons.
Learn more about efforts to bring more diverse visitors to the parks.

SPJ convention – Excellence In Journalism 2012

Last week I skipped a couple days of school to attend the Society of Professional Journalists annual convention. I drove down to Fort Lauderdale with six ladies from UF’s chapter, and we shared a hotel room right on the beach! Except for two sunrise photoshoots, we didn’t get to enjoy the sun and sand however because we were immersing ourselves in Excellence in Journalism 2012 — learning how to improve our craft, talking about exciting changes in the field and meeting other students and professionals.

Presidential Hugger

Pulitzer-winner and all-around awesome person Lane DeGregory, who I met during my internship at the Tampa Bay Times, traveled to my hometown for a story!

Presidential hugger just likes to lift people up

She interviewed a local pizza man known for his charity work who became famous after he scooped up President Barack Obama. I was blown away by Lane’s ability to capture so many wonderful details about her subject in such a hectic environment and short amount of time. This paragraph is hands down the best part of her piece, especially the last line.

“Van Duzer said he didn’t ask for permission; the Secret Service didn’t know it was coming. They had put away all the restaurant’s knives and scissors. But you can’t confiscate a bear hug.”

Here’s the story behind the story by Michael Kruse, another fantastic storyteller at the Times.